Tagged: relationships

Blog of the week | 4th October 2015

Following on from Dave Bunker’s great 15 Minute Forum earlier this term which opened up the debate about forming positive relationships with young people and the role of behaviour management in this process, this weeks blog of the week goes to Dave’s post on the matter:

Why telling new teachers to build relationships is bad advice by Dave Bunker.

A great compliment to Dave’s blog is this post by Katie Ashford on the need for high expectations for all students regardless of their ‘issues.’

Give him a break by Katie Ashford.

I have taught too many kids like Palmer, and whilst I still have a lot to learn about building the strongest relationships and providing the best possible support, I am sure about one thing. If you give a kid a break, you reduce your standards for them, and to do so is to allow them to fall to those low standards. We do care, and caring is a thread inseparable from the complex tapestry of teaching. But sometimes, the most caring thing we can do for a child is to raise our standards even higher.

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#CPD – 15 minute forum: Positive relationships with staff and students

Sharon Porter | @sporteredu

Sharon Porter | @sporteredu

15 minute forum: ‘Positive relationships with staff and students’ | Sharon Porter | @sporteredu

Date: 12/09/2014

Summary of forum.

Make it a habit.

  • Make an effort at all times (even if you are feeling ‘crappy’).
  • Smile and say “Hello!”, “Good morning!”, “Good day!”  Even if you don’t know that member of staff or even if you don’t teach that student…it can make a difference to someone’s day.

Positive relationships with students.

  • You will need to do the usual text book stuff
    • Praise students
    • Let them know that you are proud of them (verbally or written amongst feedback in books)
    • Make sure that students are aware of your expectations; be firm, be fair be consistent.

Positive relationships with colleagues

  • Make eye contact when you are talking (it might feel a bit strange to start with but it just comes across as rude if you don’t!)
  • Listen.  Really listen.  Try not to sit there thinking about what you are going to say next…you’re not really listening.  Summarise what you’ve heard and clarify this with ‘informed’ questioning.
  • Express yourself; don’t just agree all the time.  Challenge colleagues in conversation and occasionally ask “why?”
    • Why do you think that?  Where did you get that information?…..
  • Give someone a compliment – I really liked what you had to say in that meeting because…; I thought that proforma you produced was really good; I particularly liked….
  • Don’t shoot folks down if you don’t like what they have to say.  Suggest alternatives
  • Offer help – even if you are really busy, can you take on a small task to help a colleague?  There is always someone in a worse position that you.
  • Be positive…it will make you feel better!